CommComm posted on September 7, 2011 23:37

This is the first paragraph which explains what's now available.

"I am writing to share exciting news:  today, we are making journal content on JSTOR published prior to 1923 in the United States and prior to 1870 elsewhere, freely available to the public for reading and downloading. This includes nearly 500,000 articles from more than 200 journals, representing approximately 6% of the total content on JSTOR." 

http://about.jstor.org/news-events/news/jstor%E2%80%93free-access-early-journal-content

 

Alonzo LaMont


Posted in: Hopkins Community  Tags:
CommComm posted on August 30, 2011 21:22

          In the coming weeks and months you'll be reading here and in other places about the changes coming to the Welch Library. If you've been around campus (or even if you haven't) you've probably heard these changes involve the Library building itself. This is true. Over time, we've found that more patrons access the library electronically and utilize the physical space less and less. This is also true. What you should keep in mind is that these changes are being made in the best interests of our patrons.

          "Will the Library be the same?"

         The greater question is: what is the Library? Is it the building itself? Or is it the service and services you receive. We want to provide greater amounts of these. Moving forward, this is ultimately the true test. Can we provide the resources you want. Perhaps you'll discover that the "rituals" you enjoyed that are associated with the Library will no longer be in place. There's no denying these will be different. But in the information/technology age change comes almost on a daily basis. Doctors now travel with tablets and gadgets. Health information is conveyed through a variety of protocols. 

          We think the Library is people. And the people at Welch will continually try to serve our community the best we can. You've told us that online access to journals and databases is a priority. We want to make sure you have this access. We also want to continually update our collection, in order to stay as current as possible. The new methods we'll be implementing are designed to make what the Library has to offer easier and more efficient. Think of us as launching a grand "outreach program". We intend to improve and expand our presence on campus, and hopefully our patrons will have a fuller understanding of the collaborative role the Welch Library can play in their future. We're not trying to re-invent the wheel. We're just trying to make your scholastic, academic and research life a little better. 

          We know the shock of the new doesn't always come with a 100% approval rating. Customer service has continual  peaks and valleys. We anticipate some disorientation, questions and perhaps a little anxiety. Our only defense is that we want to be better. We want to do more for you. Behind the numbers, behind all the facts we could present----the heart and soul of the changes we're presenting is...............doing more for our patrons. Providing those services and resources ---- Wherever You Are!

Alonzo LaMont 

 


Posted in: Hopkins Community  Tags:

          I saw this and wanted to know which side of the argument you fell on. I think if I'm a grandparent I've earned the right to some serious down-time. But more and more, as you know, grandparents are now in it for the long haul. The article focuses on the monetary arrangements that baby boomers are dealing with, but I think it's more than that. Since we have SO many kids raising kids, and knowing less and less about raising them---the common prevailing decisions center around kids getting dropped off at grandma/pa's place on a very regular basis.

          I think we should perhaps examine this "phenomenon" from a more cultural  perspective. Anyone who's caught a single episode of MTV's "Teen Moms" can see this all too frequently. The grandparents are literally DRAFTED into the complete care and raising of their daughter's children. The daughter are typically impatient with their mom's playing such a high profile role, and then wanting to have a say about it, and then we have all the wonderful crisis moments centered around ungratefulness and name-calling. It's not a pretty sight. Grandparents deserve so much more.

 http://yourlife.usatoday.com/parenting-family/caregiving/story/2011-08-26/Grandparents-play-a-bigger-role-in-child-rearing/50146016/1?dlvrit=205764

 

Alonzo LaMont

 


Posted in: Hopkins Community  Tags:

I posted this article on FB, but the topic is one close to me beating heart......this quote gives a short summary (link below). 

"The most alarming finding in the ERIAL studies was perhaps the most predictable: when it comes to finding and evaluating sources in the Internet age, students are downright lousy. Only seven out of 30 students whom anthropologists observed at Illinois Wesleyan “conducted what a librarian might consider a reasonably well-executed search,” wrote Duke and Andrew Asher, an anthropologist at Bucknell University, whom the Illinois consortium called in to lead the project.Throughout the interviews, students mentioned Google 115 times -- more than twice as many times as any other database. The prevalence of Google in student research is well-documented, but the Illinois researchers found something they did not expect: students were not very good at using Google. They were basically clueless about the logic underlying how the search engine organizes and displays its results. Consequently, the students did not know how to build a search that would return good sources. (For instance, limiting a search to news articles, or querying specific databases such as Google Book Search or Google Scholar.)"

 

          The issues that should concern everyone are the homogeneity of search information and search skills. Many thought that the internet would breed a greater degree of individuality. Has that come to fruition? We're so delighted when we hear of some school adding all new computers, but what are they learning? E-mail. Youtube? Facebook? Perhaps we should become more excited when test scores rise, more scholarly work is created or more students daring to tread outside the box.

          We hear over and over about new technology "leveling the playing field." Maybe we're just leveling the students. Are students all working on the "same paper?" When students arrive at the Circulation desk and they want HIV data or health reports in Baltimore City? Are they working on the same results, coming to the same conclusions----are they going off the beaten track to find anything? Unfortunately, the internet can't make you search creatively. It can't make you want to take a second look at anything.  

http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2011/08/22/erial_study_of_student_research_habits_at_illinois_university_libraries_reveals_alarmingly_poor_information_literacy_and_skills

 

Alonzo LaMont


Posted in: Hopkins Community , Technology Updates  Tags:
CommComm posted on August 25, 2011 19:07
The Biomedical & Life Sciences Collection: AUGUST UPDATES
Use the access link below to see the new talks as well as for access
New talks added to the following existing series: Physiology and Pathophysiology of Neuroglia
2 new talks added:
 
 
Epilepsy and Seizures
1 new talk added:
1. Animal models of seizures and epilepsy (41 mins)
Dr. Wolfgang Löscher - University of Veterinary Medicine, Germany
http://hstalks.com/?t=BL1262987
 
Protein Phosphorylation
1 new talk added:
 
Topical Talks
3 new talks added:
1. The quest for multi-functional medicines: path for progress: the tamoxifen story (21 mins)
Prof. V. Craig Jordan - Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington, D.C., USA
http://hstalks.com/?t=BL1002819
2. The quest for multi-functional medicines: path for progress: the SERM story (31 mins)
Prof. V. Craig Jordan - Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington, D.C., USA
http://hstalks.com/?t=BL1002820
 
Obesity:
Epidemiology, Etiology, Consequences and Treatment
1 new talk added:
Prof. Louise Baur - University of Sydney, Australia
http://hstalks.com/?t=BL0452776
 
Molecular Basis of Bacterial Infection
1 new talk added:
 
Autism and Autism Spectrum Disorders:
History, Diagnosis, Neurobiology, Treatment and Outcome
4 new talks added:
 
1. Assessment and diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders in toddlers (32 mins)
Dr. Celine A. Saulnier - Emory University, USA
Dr. Kasia Chawarska - Yale University School of Medicine, USA
http://hstalks.com/?t=BL1042801
 
 
3. Neurocognitive models of autism (51 mins)
Prof. Stephen Hooper - University of North Carolina School of Medicine, USA
http://hstalks.com/?t=BL1042891
 
4. Psychopharmacology of autism (50 mins)
Prof. Christopher J. McDougle - Indiana University School of Medicine, USA
http://hstalks.com/?t=BL1042777
 
Non-Clinical Testing for Toxicity of Pharmaceuticals:
Regulatory and Practical Standards for Testing and Application
1 new talk added:
 
Calcium Signaling:
Regulation, Mechanisms, Effectors, Role in Disease and Recent Advances
Existing talk updated:
Alonzo LaMont
 

Posted in: Hopkins Community , Technology Updates  Tags:
CommComm posted on August 24, 2011 20:22

I wanted to follow up on the previous post about mobile technology. And as the article mentions, essentially, if you're in academia, or medicine or frankly any field----you're basically "on". "On" representing the state of constancy in relationship to your employment. The dirty little mobile secret that's not so secret is that everyone is probably working longer since breaks are no longer breaks, lunch may not feel entirely like lunch, and "being home for the day" doesn't signify the sequestered retreat status it used to be.

Since we're attached to the hip with devices, who among us doesn't hear and respond to the vibrations of "work calling," when you're meeting a friend or out with family? It invades our psychology.

We think we're staying on top of our work, when it fact work is staying on top of us. And for all ye Doubting Thomases and Thomasinas? Take a walk during "lunch" around the east Baltimore campus. Se how relaxed everyone is.

http://chronicle.com/blogs/worldwise/blackberry-and-beyond-technology-and-global-higher-education/28592

 

Alonzo LaMont


Posted in: Hopkins Community , Technology Updates  Tags:

This is actually a re-post from our Facebook page from August 9th, but it certainly qualifies as a topic worthy of a second look There seems to be more than a little uproar surrounding iPads, smartphones, tablets and hospital IT staffs having the technology to work all these gizmos. Judging from the comments in this article, the theoretical smacks right up against the hard reality. For hospitals nowhere near the mobile technology boom, you can hear that little green-eyed monster of envy rearing it's ugly head as we speak. As with all things, supply and demand will ultimately dictate the market for the gotta-have new medical toys. However, the more pointed question is the issue of hospital haves and hospital have-nots. Who's gonna get your business? Who makes the greater impression when they enter a hospital room? Do you want your bedside manner to be smooth talk, or real time data? I'm aware of the value of each, but patients can be a demanding bunch these days. Everybody wants their own piece of empowerment bragging rights. 

 

 http://kraftylibrarian.com/?p=1319

 

Alonzo LaMont


Posted in: Hopkins Community , Technology Updates  Tags:
CommComm posted on August 10, 2011 19:24
Alonzo LaMont

Posted in: Hopkins Community  Tags:

According to Mary Francis Cooper Deputy Director of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, “we had to work around the constraints of a building that was designed to be protective of books”. At some point in our lives, most of us probably know what that feels like. You don’t have to be someone who works in a library to appreciate the exact “dimensions” of that statement. Libraries can seem imposing with their seemingly endless labyrinths of information.  Also, because of the speed of our social media, they can easily appear dated by their design. “Where are the big social areas? Where are the Kindles and Nooks----what do you mean there’s no place for yoga classes?” Back in 2002 the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh realized they needed to embrace the neck-in-neck charges of both the information era and the wonderful world of social interaction. Brian Mathews, author of "Marketing Today's Academic Library" takes if from there....

http://www.americanlibrariesmagazine.org/columns/next-steps/pioneer-evolves

 

Alonzo LaMont


Posted in: Hopkins Community  Tags:
CommComm posted on August 9, 2011 21:55

You can't go wrong with any of these.

 

http://www.smashingapps.com/2011/07/21/7-library-tools-students-would-find-handy.html

 

Alonzo LaMont


Posted in: Hopkins Community  Tags:

Search Blog

Authors

Month List