CommComm posted on September 29, 2010 05:10

Why are these children so excited to play dress up? Because they already registered for the Welch Library classes on the 29th! Four classes! It's a brain bonanza!

You heard right---a brain bonanza.

Here's the link. It's not too late. C'mon now, can't you feel that Endnote calling

http://www.welch.jhu.edu/classes/free.cfm


Posted in: Informationists , Welch Education  Tags:
CommComm posted on August 31, 2010 23:40

 

In case it happens to come up in conversation, or in case a patron brings it to your attention---there IS a "Welch Lilienfeld Collection" on Stack Level 5. A collection of Lilienfeld books (not ALL of the Lilienfeld books) are now in Welch, and they're right up there in their own little area. I took a road trip and discovered them huddled together as if they'd just arrived from Ellis Island.  


CommComm posted on August 31, 2010 23:16

I stand corrected. The Wired magazine article (the Sept. issue) is titled "The Web is Dead. Long Live the Internet," by Chris Anderson. I may have the title wrong, but the essence of the previous post to the article itself is about the same. Let me share a couple of gems from the article that caught my eye:

"Two decades after it's inception, the World Wide Web has been eclipsed by Skype, Netflix, peer-to-peer, and a quarter-million other apps."

Along with this little nugget....

"Over the past few years, one of the most important shifts in the digital world has been the move from the wide-open Web to semi-closed platforms that use the internet for transport but not the browser for display. It's driven primarily by the rise of the iPhone model of mobile computing, and it's a world Google can't crawl, one where HTML doesn't rule. And it's the world that consumers are increasingly choosing, not because they're rejecting the idea of the Web but because these dedicated patterns often just work better or fit better into their lives (the screen comes to them, they don't have to go to the screen).

 


CommComm posted on August 10, 2010 20:45

The Welch Library had an all-staff meeting on July 29th, and Nancy Roderer, Claire Twose and Blair Anton presented a number of questions pertaining to the current and future status of the library. Included in their talk was a mention of the interviews and articles generated by Nancy, Blair and Claire along with the papers that have been presented at a variety of places (Peru! For one). Needless to say, the "long arm of the library" is now accumulating a very healthy measure of public relations attention, both local and national. For those unable to attend the meeting, or for those who are curious about what Nancy, Claire and Blair addressed, here are the list of questions.

 1.  Is Welch implementing a new model of librarianship

 2.  How do we know that this is what the library’s users want?

 3.  What’s an informationist?

 4.  What do informationists do differently with regard to providing services?" 

 5.  Give examples of services informationists have provided that are more in-depth.

 

 6.  What challenges do the informationists face with regard to users’ perceptions?

 

 7.  Where are we on reducing the paper collection and the number and size of physical library spaces?

 

 8.  Is the new model working? 

 

 9.  Will library services and jobs continue to change?

 

 

 


CommComm posted on August 4, 2010 21:15

My Ace Detective, Sue Woodson, who's always hot on the trail of new knowledge sent me this about BRAIN NAVIGATOR:

BrainNavigator is a new Elsevier product that merges images from brain atlases with 3D software from the Allen Institute for Brain Science. The result is a product that lets you make notes on both 2D and 3D images, upload your own images, and plan injection points. Important information:

  • Our trial ends September 24th.
  • You must create a user account to use the product.
  • You must be on campus to use the product during the trial.
  • Rodent information is available throughout the trial. Human and monkey information will be added on August 26th.

 

 

Thanks Sue!

Alonzo LaMont


Beginning July 23, 2010 My NCBI tool replaces eRA Commons for Bibliography Management

NIH is now providing PD/PI’s (program directors and program investigators for us laymen) with a more efficient, accurate and user-friendly way to manage their professional bibliographies, associate publications with grant awards, and ensure compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy.

eRA Commons has partnered with the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) to link NCBI’s personal online tool, “My NCBI,” to Commons. My NCBI offers an online portal—“My Bibliography”—for users to maintain and manage a list of all of their authored works, such as journal articles, manuscripts accepted for publication, books, and book chapters.

The partnership between eRA Commons and My NCBI allows Commons users to benefit from My Bibliography’s ability to populate citation data from PubMed , PubMed Central , and the NIH Manuscript Submission system , and to readily maintain accurate, structured and up-to-date bibliographic information. The improved data quality resulting from this integration enhances the ability of the NIH to manage and monitor the results of its research portfolio.

These are the REQUIRED ACTIONS:

1.     If not already established, PD/PIs must establish a My NCBI account to gain access to My Bibliography.

2.     My NCBI accounts must be linked to eRA Commons accounts.

3.     As of July 23, 2010, Commons will no longer support manual entry of citations. PD/PIs will no longer be able to type or copy and paste citation data into Commons and must enter new citations into their My NCBI accounts.

4.     As of October 22, Commons will no longer display citations that a PI has manually entered into Commons. All citations previously entered manually into Commons will be removed from the Commons system. Therefore, these citations must be added to My Bibliography so that they will continue to appear in Commons and can be associated with future annual progress reports.

 

 


CommComm posted on March 24, 2010 04:06

Wilmer Eye Institute

This picture highlights the Wilmer Eye Institute in eye-popping style.

http://chronicle.com/blogPost/Campus-Architecture-Database-/21920/

The article is from The Chronicle of Higher Education. It's been my experience that many Hopkins folk don't always venture around the campus. Ahhhh, how easy it is to pick up lunch and hastily retreat back to the safety of our dearly beloved cubicles and offices. With Springtime now floating into our senses like freshly scented begonias, maybe a quick roadtrip down to Wilmer will enhance the daily routine. Quick stroll in the sunshine, anybody?


1) Introduction to Grant Writing -- A Welch Class (pre-registration req.)

Date: March 30, 2010
Start Time: 01:00 PM
End Time: 04:00 PM
Place: Welch Library, Mezzanine
Speaker: Deborah McClellan, Ph.D.
phone Number: (410)955-7559
Cost: Free

 


Designed for those with little or no grant-writing experience, this session introduces essentials of grant preparation, from developing a research idea to revising and resubmitting a proposal. The focus is on R01 applications for the NIH, but many of the principles apply equally to proposals for other agencies. The course emphasizes conveying scientific content clearly and succinctly through logical organization and effective presentation of the proposed research.

http://intranet.welch.jhmi.edu/insidewelch/tptest4/freeclassregistration.cfm

2) Personal Information Management -- A Welch Class (pre-registration req.)

Date: March 31, 2010
Start Time: 09:30 AM
End Time: 11:30 AM
Place: Mountcastle Auditorium
Speaker: Katie Vizenor, MLS, MA & Victoria Goode, MLIS
phone Number: (410)955-7559
Cost: Free


Socio-technical researcher Victoria Bellotti defines Personal Information Management (PIM) as “the ordering of information through categorization, placement, or embellishment in a manner that makes it easier to retrieve when it is needed”. Using William Jones’ Keeping Found Things Found as a guide, this 2-hour workshop will take you through the steps of defining you information needs and style, choosing and using personal information technologies, maintaining your files and protecting your privacy.

 

3) Quosa: A Welch Class (pre-registration req.)

Date: March 31, 2010
Start Time: 01:00 PM
End Time: 02:15 PM
Place: Lab #2, 2024 Building
Speaker: Stella Seal, MLS
phone Number: (410)955-7559
Cost: Free


PubMed is the National Library of Medicine's database that provides access to over 17 million biomedical citations and offers links to many online publications and related articles. Learn about Citation Matcher to locate incomplete citations and how the Details, History and Clipboard features can assist you in creating searches and managing results. Learn to build expert search strategies with the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Database, save search strategies and set up alerts via MyNCBI, and how to access Welch electronic journal holdings or request articles through FIND IT @ JH.

 

 


CommComm posted on February 12, 2010 03:47

The Friday, Feb. 12th lecture "10 Things I wish someone had told me about writing a Research Paper" has been cancelled, and will be re-scheduled. The snow has wrecked havoc on all classes this past week. Hopefully, (snow fingers crossed) in the days ahead everything class/lecture related will be sorted out.


Posted in: Welch Education  Tags:
CommComm posted on February 4, 2010 20:52

Lori Rosman our Public Health and Basic Science Informationist, will deliver a lecture on QUOSA this month. Lori shared few comments on the advantages of QUOSA. "It's great for  downloading full texts, storing and managing PDF's, searching the full text of articles, setting up search alerts and you can go back and forth between REFWORKS AND QUOSA in terms of their compatability for bibliographic management. The compatibility with REFWORKS is an excellent feature to have".

Lori's QUOSA lecture is on Feb. 17th, 12;30-1:30 at Mountcastle Auditorium (PCTB Bldg.)


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